Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘food producers’

Karen-Nolan_Food-Producer-farmerHave you ever stared at a plastic-wrapped chicken in your local supermarket wondering what exactly “farm-fresh” means? Two words, selected to conjure up images of a healthy, outdoor environment. They may even be accompanied by a charming illustration of rural idyll. Together they imply traditional farming methods and salt-of-the-earth values of a farmer concerned for the welfare of his livestock and the quality of his produce. That may very well be the case, but placing “farm fresh” on the label does not guarantee that its contents ever had access to the great outdoors or even a particularly pleasant existence.

The chicken did originate from some class of a farm and there is no denying its freshness, but that is not telling us the whole story. Was it free to roam outdoors and scratch the earth as is its natural disposition? Not likely if the label does’t read “free-range”. Was the bird raised in the stated country of origin or was it just just packed there? Is it possible that it was fed hormones, antibiotics or GMO grain? Without organic certification who can tell. While consumers are not openly lied to, larger brands tend to gloss over the cold, hard facts of how our food has been treated before it hits the supermarket shelves. The unbridled truth may not make for easy digestion and many people prefer not to ask too many questions.

There is, however, a portion of the population who like to buy food from producers that they know and trust. They are happier in the knowledge that the food they eat that has been reared or grown as close to home as possible. Food that is in season and without chemicals. Some folk want less packaging going to landfill, fewer air-miles to feel guilty about and to be assured that everyone involved is treated fairly.

Farmers’ markets are a great way to connect with food producers in your area. You get to chat with them face-to-face and find out how they farm. If you don’t have a market nearby, your local authority might be persuaded to provide support in setting one up. A good way to dip your toes into a communal enterprise is to start a food buying group with your friends and neighbours. Placing a large order allows the group access to quality produce at a fair price, direct from source, which as individuals would be impossible. According to Suma, UK’s largest independent wholefood wholesaler/distributor: “Buying Groups vary from individuals to groups of friends, neighbours, relatives, or large-scale community-based projects, ……Buying in bulk can help to reduce your carbon footprint, minimise the amount of packaging you use, and save you money on your shopping.”
Community supported agriculture is where like-minded people come together to employ farmers and growers to produce enough food for the collective. It may be in the form of a club with a subscription, which in turn entitles its members to a weekly/monthly supply of vegetables, cereals, dairy or meat products. It provides a secure market for the farmer and direct access to local, fresh, seasonal food for the community.

The Food Assembly is a technology-assisted method of managing a food club. It is rapidly gaining popularity in the UK but can be applied to any geographic area. The website gives information on how to form a club with the added benefit of an online shop where members can order their weekly shop and pay upfront. The Food Assembly system requires each club to have a “host”. The host deals with the processing of the orders and the organising of a local delivery/ pick-up point. Both the host and the Food Assembly take a small percentage allowing food producers to earn over 80% of the price they set. Far more lucrative than dealing with supermarkets. Food Assembly Producers also know how much to harvest each week for orders, which means there’s no food waste.

So let’s get to know our local producers. Help them earn a fair living for their hard work and we get to eat healthier food, boost local employment and circulate money around our communities. Definitely food for thought….

Read Full Post »

Father's day graphic

It’s two days to Father’s day and if your still scratching your head as to how to let your dear ole dad know how much you appreciate him then here are a few ideas:

Feeling creative? You could always make something. Yummy things to eat like scrummy biscuits or a cake will always go down well. Dad may be pleased to sport a funky beanie hat lovingly knitted by one of his devoted offfspring. If you are good at art you could even paint him a picture or frame one of your arty photos. He’s your dad- he’ll love anything you produce!

If you want to buy something special then consider buying local. Again food is a good option. You may have some artisan food producers or craft makers in your area offering interesting items.

Does your dad have a hobby? DIY equipment is usually a winner. This means he can make things or ,better still, fix things to reuse (even your things!). Green-fingered dads would undoubtedly appreciate seedlings for the veg patch or maybe a fruit tree, both of which you’ll find at your local garden centre.

All in all dads are an easy bunch to please. Whatever you decide to do, make sure you let him know how much you care.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: